Oct 27, 2014

Honesty (FHE)

Our family home evening lesson this week was based on Chapter 31 from the Gospel Principles manual, Honesty.

Song:  We sang song #149, I Believe in Being Honest, from the Primary Children's Songbook.  It goes as follows:

I believe in being honest;
I believe in being true,
That honesty should start with me
In all I say, in all I do.
I'll form good habits in my youth,
To keep my word, to tell the truth,
To speak up in defending right
And keep my name and honor bright.
I believe in being honest;
I believe in being true,
That honesty should start with me
In all I say, in all I do.

Lesson: Honesty is a principle of salvation.  It is important to learn what honesty is, how we are tempted to be dishonest, and how we can overcome this temptation.  God is honest and just in all things (Alma 7:20). We too must be honest in all things to become like Him.

Lying is dishonest.  Lying is intentionally deceiving others. Bearing false witness is one form of lying. The Lord gave this commandment to the children of Israel: “Thou shalt not bear false witness against thy neighbor” (Exodus 20:16)  To steal is dishonest.  Jesus taught, “Thou shalt not steal” (Matthew 19:18). Stealing is taking something that does not belong to us.  To cheat is dishonest.  We cheat when we give less than we owe, or when we get something we do not deserve.

People use many excuses for being dishonest. People lie to protect themselves and to have others think well of them. Some excuse themselves for stealing, thinking they deserve what they took, intend to return it, or need it more than the owner. Some cheat to get better grades in school or because “everyone else does it” or to get even.  These excuses and many more are given as reasons for dishonesty. To the Lord, there are no acceptable reasons. When we excuse ourselves, we cheat ourselves and the Spirit of God ceases to be with us. We become more and more unrighteous.

To become completely honest, we must look carefully at our lives. If there are ways in which we are being even the least bit dishonest, we should repent of them immediately.  When we are completely honest, we cannot be corrupted. We are true to every trust, duty, agreement, or covenant, even if it costs us money, friends, or our lives. Then we can face the Lord, ourselves, and others without shame.

Activity: I had a hard time thinking of an activity for honesty, so I decided to use the story of the Boy who Cried Wolf as a base.  I had June's stuffed animal hippo run up to her and said, "June, the spider is going to get me!"  When June checked, there was no spider, and I wrapped a thing string around Baby Hippo to signify the way lying traps us.  Then, I said, "Baby Hippo, lying is wrong.  You should be honest." I repeated this a few more times, always wrapping more and more string around the animal.  The last time, I placed a big toy spider over the tied-up Baby Hippo and then had her shout for help again.  And this time, I had the spider "get" Baby Hippo because she had lied so much, no one trusted her.  She also couldn't get away herself because she was tied-up in the bands of lying.  June, of course, ended up "saving" Baby Hippo.  We talked about how to get out of the bands, through the Atonement and repentance.  I grabbed a pair of scissors and cut the strings off Baby Hippo and I explained that the scissors represented the Atonement.  By applying it in our lives, we can free ourselves from the bondage of dishonesty.



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